...
Search

Celadon

Celadon glazes were first developed in China during the Song Dynasty (960-1279), and quickly became popular throughout East Asia. These glazes are known for their subtle greenish-blue color, which is achieved through the use of iron oxide and a reduction firing technique.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, celadon glazes were particularly popular in Korea and Japan. Korean celadons were known for their delicate crackle patterns, while Japanese celadons often featured intricate designs and motifs.

One of the most famous examples of Asian celadon ceramics is the Longquan celadon of China’s Zhejiang province. Longquan celadons were produced from the Song Dynasty through the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and into the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). They are known for their smooth, jade-like surfaces and subtle variations in color.

Celadon glazes were also used on a variety of ceramic forms, including bowls, vases, and figurines. These objects were highly prized and were often used for ceremonial purposes or as luxury items for the elite.

Today, celadon glazes continue to be used by ceramic artists around the world. While the techniques used to create these glazes have evolved over time, the subtle beauty of celadon remains a testament to the skill and creativity of Asian ceramic artists.

Filters

Styles
Styles
Origin
Origin
Period
Period
Price
Price Filter - slider
£0£1,650
Material
Materials Filter
Techniques
Techniques Filter
Seraphinite AcceleratorOptimized by Seraphinite Accelerator
Turns on site high speed to be attractive for people and search engines.