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Carton-Pierre

Carton-Pierre is a French term that translates to “paper-mache.” It is a type of plaster that was commonly used in the 18th and 19th centuries to create decorative art objects such as wall mirrors, picture frames, and figurines.

Carton-Pierre is made by mixing plaster with paper pulp or sawdust, which creates a lightweight and durable material that can be molded into intricate shapes and designs. Once the plaster mixture has been molded, it is allowed to dry and harden before being sanded and finished with a decorative coating, such as gilt or paint.

In the 18th century, Carton-Pierre was a popular material for creating ornate decorative art pieces, particularly in France and England. The lightweight and moldable properties of the material allowed for intricate designs and details that could not be achieved with other materials such as wood or stone. This made it a popular choice for creating decorative elements in grand interiors such as palaces, English country houses, and stately homes.

Carton-Pierre was also used in the creation of theatrical sets and props, as it was lightweight and could be easily transported and manipulated on stage. Overall, Carton-Pierre was a versatile and popular material in the 18th century, known for its intricate designs and durability.

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